On other teams, they are small -- maybe a day’s work. Both are possible; both are the right answer. Learn how large backlogs hinder teams and 4 ways to reduce product backlog size. Long answer: For some teams, a User Story is Big, several days or weeks of work. Large scrum teams developing lots of features that cross multiple business boundaries can be another indicator. When the Team Is Too Big The effectiveness of team communication decreases when the team is too large. Ultimately, it’s the scrum master’s job to make the scrum ceremonies be efficient and effective. @DaveHumm Yes - teams that are too large would either need to be broken down into smaller Scrum teams or an alternate project management methodology would need to be chosen. So what was ours? As with the daily scrum, don’t confuse an inefficient planning session with the team being too big. Your Scrum Team Might Be Too Big January 4, 2011 Leave a comment According to the ways of Scrum, the optimal Scrum team size is between five and nine people. There has been lots of research in this area that can give a lot more detail than this post, so here I just want to give a few examples, especially around ceremonies. If your team sticks to the constructs of standup and they cannot complete the meeting in less than 15 minutes, the scrum team may be too big. If your team sticks to the constructs of stand-up and they cannot complete the meeting in less than 15 minutes, the Scrum team may be too big. From Scrum, the size has always been recommended to b 7 +/- 2 (or 3..9 in the latest Scrum Guide) as the preferred size for teams. When product backlogs get too big, Scrum teams are less agile. Scrum-of-Scrums (or some alternate approaches) may work if you want to implement Scrum with multiple teams, but once you reach 3-9 Scrum teams, Nexus provides a lightweight framework and guidance on scaling Scrum. Large Scrum teams developing lots of features that cross multiple business boundaries can be another indicator.

Interestingly, I’ve seen this as a point of concern (sometimes contention) when I’ve coached people on Scrum. But as in all things agile, direct experience is always valuable.